10 things to watch for at the intersection of Tech and Law in 2017

  1. CASL, Canada’s anti-spam legislation, has been with us since July 2014. It’s a terrible piece of legislation for many reasons. In July 2017 a private right of action becomes effective that will allow anyone who receives spam as defined by CASL to sue the sender. CASL sets out statutory damages, so the complainant does not have to prove any damages. Class actions will no doubt be launched. The sad part is that breaches of CASL are to a large extent breaches of the very technical requirements of the statute, rather than the sending of what most people would call spam. At some point in 2017 we may see a court decision that ponders CASL’s legality.
  2. Pipeda, Canada’s general privacy law, has been amended to require mandatory notice to the privacy commissioner and/or possible victims when there is a serious privacy breach. This is on hold pending finalization of the regulations – and may be in effect before the end of 2017.
  3. Privacy in general will continue to be put under pressure by politicians and law enforcement officials who desire to advance the surveillance state. The good news is that there is continuing pressure being put forth by privacy advocates. A UK court, for example, decided that some recent UK surveillance legislation went too far. The Snowden revelations have spurred most IT businesses to use more effective encryption. Unfortunately, I don’t think it is safe to predict that President Obama will pardon Snowden.
  4. Canada’s trademark registration process will undergo substantive change in 2018 – some good, some not so good. In 2017 the regulations and processes should be finalized, giving us more detail about how it will work in practice.
  5. We will hear a lot about security issues around the internet of things, or IOT. IOT devices can be a gateway to mayhem. IOT things include such disparate devices as thermostats, light switches, home appliances, door locks, and baby monitors. The problem is that far too often designers of IOT devices don’t design security into them. That makes it easy for malfeasants to use these devices to break into whatever networks they are connected to.
  6. Artificial Intelligence, or AI, will continue to creep in everywhere. AI is now employed in many things we use – ranging from google translate to semi-autonomous cars. Voice controlled screen and non-screen interactions – which use AI – are on the rise.
  7. AI is starting to be used in tools that lawyers use, and for tools that will replace lawyers in some areas. In 2017, we will start to see some major upheavals in the practice of law, and how people get their legal needs met. At some point every lawyer (and knowledge workers in general) will have a holy cow moment when they realize the impact of AI on their profession. AI will make inroads in things like legal research, and contract generation. It will also foster the provision of legal services online by non-lawyers to a vast underserved market that won’t pay lawyers on the current business model. These services may not be quite as good as those provided by lawyers, but consumers will be happy to pay less for what they perceive as good enough. And the quality, breadth, and sophistication of these services will continue to improve as AI improves.
  8. Another AI issue we will hear about in 2017 is embedded bias and discrimination. AI makes decisions not on hard coded algorithms, but rather learns from real world data and how things react to it. That includes how humans make decisions and respond and react to things. It thus tends to pick up whatever human bias and discrimination exists. That is a useful thing if the purpose is to predict human reactions or outcomes, like an election. But it is a bad thing if the AI makes decisions that directly affect people such as who to hire or promote, who might be criminal suspects, and who belongs on a no-fly list.
  9. The cloud has finally matured and will be adopted by more businesses in 2017. Most major international players now have data centres in Canada, which helps to raise the comfort level for Canadian businesses. Many CIOs now realize that putting everything in the cloud means that life is easier as a result, as it can make business continuity, scalability, mobility, upgrades, and security easier. Care must be taken to make sure that the right solutions are chosen, and it is being done right – but there are compelling reasons why it can be better than doing it yourself.
  10. The youngest generation in the workforce is always online, connected, and communicating, and expects their workplace to fit their lifestyle and not the other way around. Firms that embrace that will get the best and the brightest of the rising stars. It used to be that business tech was ahead of consumer tech, but that trend has been reversing for some time. More workers will get frustrated when they can do more with their own devices and apps than their corporate ones. That can lead to business challenges in areas such as security – but these challenges around rogue tech in the workplace have been around for decades.

Cross posted to Slaw